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GB London 2017 World Championships predictions

GB London 2017 World Championships predictions

Following his reports looking into the strengths and weaknesses in the British teams, Steve Smythe makes predictions on how GB athletes might fare at the London World Championships

According to our London 2017 World Championships predictions, Britain’s women would win four medals – Laura Muir at 1500m, Katarina Johnson-Thompson at heptathlon, Sophie Hitchon in the hammer and the 4x100m relay team – this summer.

However, there are a further four events where we are predicting a top six place which could lead to more medals with an upsurge in form in 2017 or if the crowd can lift the home athletes to new heights.

We have also predicted that the men would win five medals, giving us a very good total of nine and again there are some predicted near misses such as Adam Gemili at 200m, Robbie Grabarz at high jump and Tom Bosworth in the 20km race walk.

Do you think Britain can get as many as nine medals in London? It’s best ever World Championships in terms of overall medals was Stuttgart in 1993 where the nation got 10 medals, three of which were gold.

We are also predicting that there will be five men’s and women’s events where Britain will have no representation. There are probably a further five events where British qualification will be in the balance due to the tough standards.

Analysis of men’s athletics events in the UK | Click here
Analysis of women’s athletics events in the UK | Click here

For much more detailed analysis, including top three predictions for London 2017 in each event, see the January 5 (men’s events) and January 12 (women’s events) editions of AW magazine, which are available to buy and read digitally here.

Our ‘state of the nation’ series is designed to encourage debate, so what are your views? Whether you agree or disagree with our predictions, let us know by sending us a tweet @AthleticsWeekly, popping a post on Facebook or commenting beneath this article.

London 2017 World Championships predictions

Women’s events

100m: 7th Desiree Henry
200m: 4th Dina Asher-Smith
400m: SF Emily Diamond
4x100m: 3rd Great Britain
4x400m: 4th Great Britain
800m: 6th Lynsey Sharp
1500m: 3rd Laura Muir
5000m: 12th Steph Twell
10,000m: 15th Jess Martin
3000m SC: heat Lennie Waite
Marathon: 10th Jo Pavey
100m hurdles: 5th Tiffany Porter, 6th Cindy Ofili
400m hurdles: 6th Eilidh Doyle
High jump: 8th Katarina Johnson-Thompson
Pole vault: 7th Holly Bradshaw
Long jump: 7th Jazmin Sawyers, 8th Lorraine Ugen
Triple jump: no competitor
Shot put: no competitor
Discus: 12th Jade Lally
Hammer: 3rd Sophie Hitchon
Javelin: no competitor
Heptathlon: 3rd Katarina Johnson-Thompson
20km walk: 30th Bethan Davies

Men’s events

100m: 8th Joel Fearon
200m: 5th Adam Gemili
400m: 7th Matthew Hudson-Smith
4x100m: 3rd Great Britain
4x400m: 3rd Great Britain
800m: SF Elliot Giles
1500m: 9th Charlie Grice
5000m: 1st Mo Farah, 5th Andy Butchart
10,000m: 1st Mo Farah
3000m SC: heats Rob Mullett
Marathon: 7th Callum Hawkins
110m hurdles: 6th Andy Pozzi
400m hurdles: 8th Jack Green
High jump: 5th Robbie Grabarz
Pole vault: NQ Luke Cutts
Long jump: 3rd Greg Rutherford
Triple jump: NQ Julian Reid
Shot put: no competitor
Discus: NQ Nick Percy
Hammer: 9th Nick Miller
Javelin: no competitor
Decathlon: 16th Ashley Bryant
20km walk: 5th Tom Bosworth
50km walk: 30th Dominic King

» For much more detailed analysis, including top three predictions for London 2017 in each event, see our ‘state of the nation’ reports in the January 5 (men’s events) and January 12 (women’s events) editions of AW magazine, which are available to buy and read digitally here

» Our state of the nation series continues with:
January 19 magazine: Jess Whittington looks at the international scene. How successful is the Diamond League and what will the IAAF’s reforms under new president Seb Coe mean for the sport?
January 26 magazine: Jason Henderson tackles the topic of young athletes’ initiatives and domestic competition. Does the sport have the best structures in place to develop the champions of tomorrow and is our competition calendar as good as it can be?
February 2 magazine: Euan Crumley reports on the club scene. Is it still the bedrock of British athletics and is the coaching system in the UK as strong as it could be?

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